Quantcast

PH, Peru share Apec limelight

By |

Peruvian President Ollanta Humala, left, walks with Philippine President Benigno Aquino ahead of a session at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation CEO Summit in Bali, Indonesia, Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013. AP PHOTO/WONG MAYE-E

BALI, Indonesia—Two leaders, two emerging economies, the same goal of achieving inclusive growth.

President Aquino shared the spotlight on Sunday with Peruvian President Ollanta Humala during the 21st Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (Apec) CEO Summit, “Why Inclusive Growth Matters,” at Bali International Convention Center here.

The two leaders spoke about how their governments were seeking to translate economic growth into real development, with Aquino inviting top Asia-Pacific business leaders to “see for yourself that, indeed, ‘it’s more fun in the Philippines.’”

The President used the country’s tourism slogan to drive home the idea that “on top of fostering stability, social inclusiveness also empowers citizens to become bona fide economic actors [who] can productively contribute to nation building.”

“It allows them to buy into the system, from which they can reap benefits,” Aquino, reading from a prepared speech that lasted nearly 10 minutes, told the audience.

Essence of growth

“The question of inclusiveness is one that strikes at the very essence of growth. Do we define growth as the mere amassing of wealth, the mere swelling of the gross national product, regardless of who benefits? Or do we abide by the principle that the strength of nations lies in the people—that the fair and just way forward, indeed the only way forward, is for the government to ensure that the system allows for equitability, where every citizen, regardless of status of birth or personal network, is allowed the opportunity to shape his destiny through his own ability and hard work?” he said.

“This is the crossroads that every economy—indeed, the entire global economy as a collective—has come to face, and I am confident that, collectively too, as humanity always has, we will rise to this challenge,” he added.

Unlike Aquino, his Peruvian counterpart spoke extemporaneously, maintaining that “economic growth in itself is not going to generate development.”

“Economic growth is money in your pocket, money in the bank,” Humala said in Spanish. “Economic development is quality of life.”

In sharing the Philippines’ drive toward inclusive and sustainable growth, Aquino paraded his administration’s conditional cash transfer program, a massive government financial effort to help the poor continued from the Arroyo administration, which adopted the idea from Brazil.

He described the cash handouts as “our flagship program” that “now benefits close to 4 million families.” Its expansion to cover families with children in high school will cost P62.6 billion in next year’s national budget.

Protection vs corruption

A major point in Aquino’s speech was the need to protect “the integrity of public finances and resources from which government intervention is sourced.”

“The Philippines has had an unfortunate history of corruption and nontransparent governance that had stunted the influx of opportunities and stifled the government’s ability to execute antipoverty strategies,” Aquino said.

“In the last three years, significant gains have been achieved in weeding out corrupt officials, instituting more open governance, and eliminating leakages in the system. In many ways, however, this task will continue to be a challenge in the years to come,” he said.

The President said the anticorruption campaign—the centerpiece of his good government program—would require a “whole-of-society approach.”

“We have already impressed our commitment on partners in the legislature, the judiciary, and the subnational or local governments. They now realize that the people will settle for nothing less than honest, accountable, service-oriented governance—and that we in the executive branch are squarely on the side of the people,” he said.

Two important laws passed in the last Congress also found a place in the President’s speech: the reproductive health law and the sin tax reform act.

Along with the K to 12 basic education law and the overall reform in the public school system, the two legislative measures are “direct government interventions that we are pursuing as a proactive way of encouraging the equitable distribution of wealth—part of a concerted plan to ensure that all sectors take part in economic growth and partake in the prosperity it brings,” the President said.

“Our task: To ensure that our people have the wherewithal to utilize, and indeed maximize, the opportunities opening up with the newfound revitalization of our economy,” he added.

Budget for 2 summits

Aquino arrived here on Sunday morning together with an 84-member delegation.

The government is spending P14.3 million for the entire group’s participation in the 21st Apec forum in Bali, which runs until Tuesday, and the East Asia Summit in Brunei on Wednesday and Thursday, Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa said in Manila.

Among those attending the two summits with the President are Finance Secretary Cesar Purisima, Trade Secretary Gregory Domingo, Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Arsenio Balisacan, Cabinet Secretary Jose Rene Almendras, Presidential Management Staff head Julia Andrea Abad and presidential protocol chief Celia Anna Feria.

Foreign Secretary Albert del Rosario and Communications Secretary Ramon Carandang arrived here ahead of the presidential group on Saturday.

In a statement issued by the Palace on Sunday, Ochoa said the P14.3-million budget would cover expenses for transportation, accommodation, food and equipment, among other things, for Aquino and the delegation.

Ochoa said the President was expected to share the Philippines’ initiatives with other Asia-Pacific leaders in both summits.

“Some of these will be in the areas of environmental protection and climate change mitigation, food security, women and the economy, and infrastructure investment,” he said.

Global CEOs

The President is expected to press for the “need to strengthen cooperation in cross-border education and skills training to bolster development of human resources amid economic growth,” Ochoa added.

At the CEO Summit, Aquino served as a panelist in the inclusive growth session with Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and Peru’s Humala.

The summit gathers together global CEOs from the Asia-Pacific region.

The President would also meet with members of the Apec Business Advisory Council (Abac) and leaders of the other 20 members of Apec for discussions of common concerns, such as the promotion of trade liberalization and facilitation, economic technical cooperation and people-to-people connectivity, Ochoa said, quoting foreign affairs officials.

At the East Asia Summit in Brunei, Aquino will take part in at least nine meetings between the Asean and Japan, South Korea, China, the United States and the United Nations.

He will attend the gala dinner to be hosted by Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah on Wednesday, as well as the closing ceremony and the handover of the Asean chair of Brunei to Burma on Thursday.—With a report from TJ Burgonio


Follow Us







Recent Stories:

Complete stories on our Digital Edition newsstand for tablets, netbooks and mobile phones; 14-issue free trial. About to step out? Get breaking alerts on your mobile.phone. Text ON INQ BREAKING to 4467, for Globe, Smart and Sun subscribers in the Philippines.

Short URL: http://globalnation.inquirer.net/?p=87221

  • Maj Gen Luo Yuan

    In our motherland – china – our dear leaders stashed their ill gotten wealth in numerous Swiss banks and American banks. Our dear leader Premier Wen Jiabao $US3.2 billion ill gotten wealth as exposed by the New York Times remains intact and hidden abroad. My point is – in our motherland – opaque type of administration (not open governance), wide spread corruption, wedding out dissent (not weeding out corrupt officials), and murdering innocent civilians in Tiananmen Square clamoring for transparency and corrupt free government are the best political ideology. Why? Because our motherland is the SECOND NEXT best economy in this planet. Enough said.

    • Zim

      who cares about your motherland? is there anybody here asked about it? anyone?

      • hello stupids

        his motherland is Philippines
        C’MON

    • Tral

      Aanga angang shongah

    • hello stupids

      yr motherland is Philippines
      stupidssssssssssssssssssss
      pretend to be Chinese
      C’MON

      • Maj Gen Luo Yuan

        Xie xie…I’m a han chinese…but you are right….we are stupid…now can you explain why our dear leader stockpiled $US3.2 billion in Swiss banks while the overwhelming majority of our comrade in our motherland – around 70% – still live in poverty. Look at our peasants which comprise almost 90% of our 1.3 billion population. It is a good thing that I am a son of a princeling and currently enjoying good French wine in the French Riviera right now or else I will also be working in some sweatshops in Guandong for Walmart.

      • hello stupids

        what is han chinese ?
        R U a sugar man?
        don’t pretend anymore

        dumb azz

      • Maj Gen Luo Yuan

        you better respect a superior han chinese like me, boy, or else i’m gonna whup your chinky azz….you lowly Philippino-chinese.

      • hello stupids

        uneducated pygmy pretend to be a Chinese

        any reason Ur so ashamed to be a PYGMY ?
        stupid pygmy

      • Maj Gen Luo Yuan

        I told you I am a han chinese superior than you. The reason why the whole world called us “maderphacking chinese” or “phackers” for short is because some lowly Philippino chinese destroy the good chinese-gangster style image of a han chinese.

      • hello stupids

        stop yr bullshit
        U don’t even know what is sugar man means
        stupid pygmy
        C’MON

      • Maj Gen Luo Yuan

        Internet troll alert!!

        The 50 Cent Party are Internet commentators (wǎngluò pínglùn yuán) hired by the government of the People’s Republic of China (both local and central) or the Communist Party to post comments favorable towards party policies in an attempt to shape and sway public opinion on various Internet message boards. The commentators are said to be paid fifty cent of Renminbi for every post that either steers a discussion away from anti-party or sensitive content on domestic websites, bulletin board systems, and chatrooms,or that advances the Communist party line.

  • Ulipur

    Bali — The
    Philippines has been ranked as the fourth “dark horse” in terms of
    growth and investment potential by industry leaders in the Asia-Pacific
    region.

    The Philippines was tied with Vietnam in fourth place—ahead of
    India, the United States, Japan and Russia—in the 2013 Asia-Pacific
    Economic Cooperation CEO Survey.

    The “dark horse” is defined in the survey as “the one economy in the
    region CEOs could surprise with more opportunity than is currently
    expected.”

    Of the 478 industry leaders surveyed, 19 percent went for Indonesia,
    11 percent for Myanmar, eight percent for China, and seven percent for
    the Philippines and Vietnam.

    The majority of the CEOs surveyed also plan to increase investments in the APEC economies next year.

    But Denis Hew, director of the APEC Policy Support Unit, said uneven growth was still expected in the Asia -acific region.

    “Among industrialized and newly industrialized economies, there are
    signs of a turnaround in economic growth, although at a moderate pace,”
    Hew said.

    “However, growth in APEC emerging and developing economies is trending downwards.”

    Hew said the Philippines, in particular, recorded a contraction in
    export earnings this year, but Presidential Communications Development
    Secretary Ramon Carandang said the export industry had always been
    volatile.

    “What is important is that our domestic economy is strong—we have high remittances as well as tourist arrivals,” Carandang said.

    The Philippines became the fastest-growing economy among the
    member-countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations in the
    first quarter of the year, with its expansion second only to China in
    the region.

    But by the second quarter the Philippines was already tied with
    China, making it the best performer among the emerging economies in the
    Asean region.

    Meanwhile, the Aquino administration is lukewarm to joining the
    Trans-Pacific Partnership, a free-trade pact being pushed by 12
    member-economies of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation goup.

    “We are still studying, doing our homework on whether to join or not,” Carandang said.

    “There are concerns that we might have to amend our Constitution to be able to join the TPP.

    “If we have to amend our Constitution, then it might be harder for us to join.”

    In Manila, the Department of Trade and Industry and the Department of
    Finance are now reviewing the Foreign Investment Negative List with a
    view to easing the restrictions on foreign ownership.

    United States Secretary of State John Kerry earlier announced that
    the talks on the trade pact were forging ahead despite President Barack
    Obama’s absence in the APEC CEO Summit here in Bali due to the US
    government shutdown.

    Kerry and US Trade Representative Michael Froman have expressed
    confidence on achieving a self-imposed year-end deadline for reaching an
    agreement on the TPP.

    Washington considers the TPP its “best vehicle” to advance its
    economic interests in the region. The free-trade zone would link an area
    with about $26 trillion in annual economic output.

    source: Manila Standard

    • arao_liwanag

      Ulolin mo ang Nanay mo. You live up to your name ulolpur/ulipur.

    • hello stupids

      RE:Philippines has been ranked as the fourth “dark horse” in terms of
      growth and investment potential by industry leaders in the Asia-Pacific
      region.
      that’s is too bad hahahahaha with another 20 chestnut in the same race
      LOSER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • hello stupids

      Of the 478 industry leaders surveyed, 19 percent went for Indonesia,
      11 percent for Myanmar, eight percent for China, and seven percent for
      the Philippines and Vietnam.

      Philippines may call the dark horse but China is the favorite

      C”MONNNNNNNNNNNNnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

    • hello stupids

      Hew said the Philippines, in particular, recorded a contraction in
      export earnings this year, but Presidential Communications Development
      Secretary Ramon Carandang said the export industry had always been
      volatile.

      honestly the government official is finding excuss

      C’MON

    • hello stupids

      The Philippines became the fastest-growing economy among the
      member-countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations in the
      first quarter of the year, with its expansion second only to China in
      the region.
      But by the second quarter the Philippines was already tied with
      China, making it the best performer among the emerging economies in the
      Asean region.

      RE :that is totally rubbish.Philippines is the poorest in GDP per capita in Asean except Cambodia and no where near the north east asia

      Philippines, GDP per capita 2,587.88 USD (2012)
      Thailand, GDP per capita 5,473.75 USD (2012)
      Malaysia, GDP per capita 10,380.54 USD (2012)

      Singapore, GDP per capita 51,709.45 USD (2012)

      By the look of the figure Philippines should be downgrade to CCC+

      • Maj Gen Luo Yuan

        what the hell is this? “Philippines should be downgrade to CCC+”. Are you some kind of money manager now? Go back to your Walmart sweatshop or I’m gonna chew your chinky azz….go quick….and get me some spring rolls.

      • hello stupids

        Moody’s upgrades PH credit rating to `investment grade to’BBB-

        Thailand is BBB+
        Malaysia is A+
        China Japan and US is AA+
        Hong Kong is AAA

        Philippines come last except Cambodia in Asean and is no where near the north east asia

        seeing is believing pygmy.that’s exactly U want to know

        hahahahahahahahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

  • arao_liwanag

    Share the limelight of being the top docile presidents, subservient US dictates. At least, the Peruvian is a handsome dog. Noynoy look is worse than a bulldog.

    • Atticus Freedom

      MABUHAY ang UNA ni NOG nog UNA sa magnanakaw ..

    • juncas

      pogi at sexy ka naman pero kurakot

    • risktakerlove8

      takot ka kasi sa bulldog naamoy kasi ang malansang kaluluwa mo eh.

  • sigena

    Philippines nasa limelight dahil pork ni pnoy

  • fernan107

    PNOY, SANA KATULAD MO RIN ANG PAPALIT SA IYO SA PAGKA PRESIDENTE….. KA INDO



Copyright © 2014, .
To subscribe to the Philippine Daily Inquirer newspaper in the Philippines, call +63 2 896-6000 for Metro Manila and Metro Cebu or email your subscription request here.
Factual errors? Contact the Philippine Daily Inquirer's day desk. Believe this article violates journalistic ethics? Contact the Inquirer's Reader's Advocate. Or write The Readers' Advocate:
c/o Philippine Daily Inquirer Chino Roces Avenue corner Yague and Mascardo Streets, Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines Or fax nos. +63 2 8974793 to 94
Advertisement
Advertisement
Marketplace