Close  

Spratlys ‘historically, legally’ ours – China spokesman

/ 04:20 PM April 12, 2019
Spratlys ‘historically, legally’ ours - China spokesman

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang AFP FILE PHOTO / NICOLAS ASFOURI

MANILA, Philippines — China has maintained that the disputed Spratly Islands are within its territory as supported by “sufficient historical and legal basis.”

Chinese Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Lu Kang made this assertion on Thursday in response to Foreign Affairs Secretary Teodoro Locsin’s earlier statement upholding the Philippines’ claim over the West Philippine Sea.

ADVERTISEMENT

READ: West PH Sea: China took what is ours – Locsin

READ: Palace: PH sovereignty ‘non-negotiable’

FEATURED STORIES

“We have taken note of those remarks made by the Philippine officials. The Nansha Islands (Spratly Islands) are within China’s territory, for which we have sufficient historical and legal basis,” Lu was quoted as saying in a transcription of his press conference posted on the website of China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

“For thousands of years, Chinese fishermen have been fishing in these waters in the South China Sea. Their rights should not be challenged,” he added.

The Philippines and China are locked in a longstanding maritime dispute over the South China Sea with Beijing claiming nearly the entire South China Sea, including parts of the West Philippine Sea.

In January 2013, the Philippines filed a case challenging the expansive claims of China in the South China Sea before the United Nations Permanent Court of Arbitration.

The arbitral tribunal ruled in favor of the country’s sovereignty over the WPS in July 2016, which China refused to recognize.

READ: PH wins arbitration case over South China Sea

President Rodrigo Duterte has chosen to set aside the ruling and pursue warmer ties with the Asian economic powerhouse.

ADVERTISEMENT

Lu added that the disputes involving the South China Sea should be “resolved through negotiations between China and countries directly concerned including the Philippines.”

“We are committed to upholding peace and stability in the South China Sea in concert with other regional countries,” he said.

However, Duterte recently warned China not to touch Pag-asa (Thitu) Island, which is the main island feature in the Philippine-occupied Kalayaan Island Group.

READ: Duterte to China: We’re pals but don’t touch Pag-asa 

The President made the statement after a report by the military’s Western Command showed a surge of vessels from a Chinese fishing fleet around Pag-asa Island.

READ: Chinese sea militia swarms around Pag-asa Island – military 

Given the alleged incursion of China in the West Philippine Sea with the presence of its vessels, Lu described the situation as “generally stable, and steady progress has been made in the consultations on the COC (code of conduct.)”

Lu further called on the Philippine government to join China in “properly managing the South China Sea issue” as well as “upholding peace and tranquility on the sea, and bringing more benefits to the two peoples.”

“We hope that the Philippine side will join us in strictly implementing the important consensus reached by the two leaders on properly resolving the South China Sea issue and safeguarding peace and stability in the South China Sea,” he said.

Read Next
LATEST STORIES
MOST READ
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.
View comments

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

TAGS: China, Lu Kang, Nansha Islands, Spratly Islands, West Philippine Sea
For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.
newsinfo

Philippine hunger rate drops in Q1 2019 — SWS

April 25, 2019 01:50 AM

globalnation

Duterte, Xi to discuss sea row in Beijing meeting

April 25, 2019 01:28 AM

usa

Who is Better: Giannis vs LeBron

April 25, 2019 01:00 AM

usa

What Does CBD Oil Do – Top 7 Benefits?

April 25, 2019 12:58 AM




© Copyright 1997-2019 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.