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Olongapo RTC reduces Pemberton prison sentence to 10 years

/ 03:16 PM April 04, 2016
Lance Corporal Joseph Scott Pemberton. Photo from Olongapo City Police

Lance Corporal Joseph Scott Pemberton. Photo from Olongapo City Police

While the Olongapo City Regional Trial Court (RTC) upheld the conviction of US Marine Lance Corporal Joseph Scott Pemberton for the 2014 killing of transgender Jeffrey “Jennifer” Laude, it however reduced his sentence from maximum of 12 years to only up to 10 years imprisonment.

In its March 30 ruling, Olongapo RTC Branch 74 Judge Roline Ginez-Jabalde cited the mitigating circumstances of “passion and obfuscation” and “intoxication” and reducing Pemberton’s prison sentence.

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READ: Pemberton guilty of homicide in Laude case, sentenced to up to 12 yrs

The court, in its December 1, 2015 ruling, noted that Pemberton agreed when Laude, dressed as a schoolgirl, approached him and offered sex.

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While inside the motel, he got excited but “felt something different, something that was not supposed to be there and realized that [Laude] was a dude,” which he said he found revolting.

“He was so enraged and in the heat of passion arm-locked, dragged him [Laude] inside the bathroom and dunked his head in the toilet bowl,” the court said, noting all that happened immediately after he discovered that Laude was a man.

Such act, the court said, fell under the mitigating circumstance of “passion and obfuscation” as stated under Article 13 (6) of the Revised Penal Code.

READ: Pemberton admits he choked Laude

On the other hand, intoxication is another mitigating circumstances because his drunkenness is not subsequent to commit the crime.

“Pemberton’s drunkenness slowed down his reflexes and mental faculties and resulted to his lack of physical coordination,” the court said, adding that being a member of the Marine Corps means he is not a habitual drinker.

“Having met the requisites, Pemberton should be accorded the benefit of the mitigating circumstance of intoxication,” the court said.

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In the same ruling, the court said the Department of Justice (DOJ) were able to present enough evidence to warrant Pemberton’s conviction and that no other person, except him, could have killed Laude inside the Celzone Lodge in Olongapo last October 11, 2014.

This effectively junked the defense’ claim that there could be a third person who might have killed Laude due to the presence of a DNA in him that was not of the US serviceman.

The court also gave credence to the prosecution’s witnesses, including its eye witnesses who testified that Pemberton was the last person they saw with Laude on the night he was killed.

Meanwhile, Laude’s legal counsel Harry Roque said they are happy with the court’s decision affirming Pemberton’s conviction.

“We are happy that Pemberton’s motion for reconsideration was not fully granted. We are happy that the decision remains that Pemberton is guilty of killing Jennifer Laude. We are happy that he was denied bail,” Roque said.
But he said the Laude family is not pleased with the reduction in the maximum sentence of the US Marine.

“We are not pleased with the lighter penalty granted. We hope that this development will inspire a review of the Visiting Forces Agreement. We stressed that the lighter penalty of six to 10 years still disqualifies Pemberton from seeking early release through parole. He will continue to spend time in jail,” Roque added. JE

(Editor’s Note: This article has been edited to correct the surname of the judge and the RTC branch number. KS)

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TAGS: Case, Jeffrey Laude, Jennifer Laude, Joseph Scott Pemberton, Laude, Olongapo, Pemberton, Prison, sentence
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