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OWWA vows more flexible loan programs for OFWS

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MANILA, Philippines—The Overseas Workers Welfare Administration has vowed to make the government’s loan assistance program for overseas Filipino workers more flexible by easing requirements and application procedures.

“We’re [finding ways to make it] more flexible and accessible to OFWs. We are making adjustments in procedures and requirements in response to reports that some are finding it hard to avail of the loan assistance,” OWWA Administrator Carmelita Dimzon said.

Dimzon clarified reports that the OWWA was asking for too many requirements that make it difficult for OFWs to avail of the program.

“It’s not true, we have to clear that. The OWWA actually almost [does] not ask for any requirement. We just check with our database if they are members, active or non-active. Then we will provide them with certification, saying they are OFW or former OFW, which they have to show to Land Bank,” she said.

“If they will avail of the loan on behalf of the member, they just need authorization. And then, of course, they have to undergo training on financial literacy, which only takes a day,” she added.

Under the P2-billion reintegration program, the OWWA offering loans for OFWs, especially displaced or distressed workers, who decide to come home for good and put up or expand an existing business in the country.

OFWs may apply for business capital loans ranging from P300,000 to P2 million from the P2-billion Reintegration Loan Fund offered by the Land Bank of the Philippines and guaranteed by the OWWA.

The loan is principally non-collateral but Dimzon explained that the evaluator of the loan application requires the borrower to submit proof of confirmed market purchase or a list of mortgageable assets for loan security purposes.

“But our OFWs and their families should also understand that their business proposal will have to be closely scrutinized,” she said.

She explained that the proposals that should show proofs of the viability of their business in line with the program’s aim of helping OFWs find sustainable alternatives to overseas employment.

Dimzon said they have been meeting with Land Bank and the Department of Agriculture officials to expand the program by including agribusiness opportunities for returning OFWs.

To date, Dimzon said more than 700 OFWs have already availed of the loan assistance amounting to more than P500 million.

“We intend to expand the program so that more people can benefit from it. We continuously improve it. We are very much aware of the feedbacks, therefore we regularly adjust our procedures when it comes to requirements to response or address the observation of the public,” she said.

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  • Earl Gates

    This is just another scam and cosmetic image publicity stunt to fool fellow OFWs. What happen to Congressional Scholarship? Ngayon ito na naman ang bagong ploy nila. I had been OFW since 1990 pero ni minsan wala akong napala sa sindikatong OWWA na yan. Gusto kong iaapply ng scholarship ang anak ko pero may salary limit sila na kundi ka working as DH hindi ka qualified. Pero kong DH ka naman they will require you to submit documents na mahihirapan kang ibigay o baka may collateral pa. Pag may kelangang irepatriate hindi nila maaksyonan kagad dahil walang pondo. Pano nangyari yun eh kung komolekta sila araw-araw parang casino. SSS lang ang masasabi kong may benepisyo tayo at may mapapala. Ang OWWA para lang TONG collector yan ng sugalan o TOLL collector na hindi ka palalabasin kong di ka magbibigay. Malamang yung mga naka-avail ng loan eh yung mga may padrino o naglagay lang.

  • Tick Phabs

    “The loan is principally non-collateral but Dimzon explained that the evaluator of the loan application requires the borrower to submit proof of confirmed market purchase or a list of mortgageable assets for loan security purposes.”

    Oh C’mon! Kaya nga maglu loan sa OWWA kasi walang mortgageable assets diba? Kung merong assets di maglu loan na lang outside OWWA. Kaya nga yung iba nagdi DH diba kasi mahirap ang buhay, kung may assets sila, eh di sana di na sila nag abroad pa? This program only intends to benefit OFW’s with higher salaries. Eh di ba mas marami yung mas konti ang sahod? Let’s face it. Mas marami ang remittances ng mga konti ang sahod kumpara sa mga malalaki ang sahod. Tapos 300 Thousand to 2 million and loanable amount? Babaan dapat yan minimum 100k to max is 500k para marami ang makikinabang, and then lower ang risk if you say “Loan security purposes”

    Kung ang simpleng DH at gusto lang magkaroon ng negosyong less than 100k ang capital, kailangan bang 300k ang ipapautang tapos pahihirapan lang sa documentations? Micro loans has lesser risk both from debtor and financier. Pagkatapos nyang mabayaran may option na dagdagan nya ang amount sa susunod na loan.

    Wag niyong gamitin ang OFWs (as a whole) para makakuha kayo ng pondong lulustayin niyo! Okay fine, meron man siguro kayong natulungan na iilan pero dapat maramdaman ng lahat ng OFW (as a whole) ito. Why don’t you list down and release the names of the beneficiaries, including the businesses? We need TRANSPARENCY! This is our money, we deserve to know the inflows and outflows! Make it accessible online so OFW’s can also “SCRUTINIZE” your work. Like how you will “SCRUTINIZE” each loan application! That’s not a challenge. It’s an ORDER! KAMI ANG BOSS NG BOSS NYO….TANDAAN NYO YAN!



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