Quantcast
Latest Stories

US won’t re-establish permanent bases in PH, says US embassy

By

Philippine Ambassador to the United States Jose Cuisia Jr. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

MANILA, Philippines — Amid plans to expand its access to the country’s bases, the United States does not intend to reestablish permanent military presence in the Philippines, according to the American Embassy in Manila.

The US Embassy said in a statement given to the Philippine Daily Inquirer that ongoing negotiations seeking to open up Philippine military bases to greater US access would like to expand cooperation between the two countries in the areas of military training and disaster preparedness.

“The United States is not seeking to create or reopen any military bases here. Working with the Philippines, we seek to promote security and stability for our nations and in the region,” Embassy officials said in a statement.

Echoing earlier statements of Philippine diplomatic officials, the Embassy said an agreement on the “temporary access by US forces” would be within the framework of the Mutual Defense Treaty and the Visiting Forces Agreement, which have been governing the parameters of Philippine-US defense ties.

“The United States and the Philippines, as friends and allies, engage in mutually agreed, mutually beneficial military cooperation to enhance the training and capabilities of our forces, strengthen inter-operability for defense as well as humanitarian assistance and disaster response, counter-terrorism, and non-proliferation,” said the Embassy.

“An access agreement will increase opportunities for joint military training and exercises and allow the pre-positioning of equipment and supplies enabling us to respond quickly to disasters,” the Embassy said of the plan, which has invited criticism from those rejecting US involvement in the country’s sovereign affairs.

Philippine Ambassador to Washington D.C. Jose Cuisia Jr. said Monday in Manila that negotiations continued on the base access plan, first bared by Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin in June. The prospect cropped up in the course of periodic bilateral consultations between the two countries, the envoy had said.

Cuisia also guaranteed the public that a base access agreement would only be sealed if deemed beneficial for both countries and would be drafted in compliance with provisions of the Philippine Constitution.

The US is the Philippines’ closest defense ally, providing financial and technical aid in bolstering the Philippine military and law enforcement agencies.

The US’ permanent military bases in the country were booted out through a Senate vote in 1992, but Washington has maintained constant defense ties with Manila, punctuated of late by its strategic pivot to the Asia-Pacific.

The Philippines is meanwhile beefing up its external defense capabilities amid regional security concerns, particularly the tense disputes over the West Philippine Sea.


Follow Us


Follow us on Facebook Follow on Twitter Follow on Twitter


Recent Stories:

Complete stories on our Digital Edition newsstand for tablets, netbooks and mobile phones; 14-issue free trial. About to step out? Get breaking alerts on your mobile.phone. Text ON INQ BREAKING to 4467, for Globe, Smart and Sun subscribers in the Philippines.

Tags: access to military facilities , Defense , Diplomacy , Foreign affairs , Global Nation , International relations , Japan , Military , military cooperation , Philippines , Security , US , US embassy , Visiting Forces Agreement



Copyright © 2014, .
To subscribe to the Philippine Daily Inquirer newspaper in the Philippines, call +63 2 896-6000 for Metro Manila and Metro Cebu or email your subscription request here.
Factual errors? Contact the Philippine Daily Inquirer's day desk. Believe this article violates journalistic ethics? Contact the Inquirer's Reader's Advocate. Or write The Readers' Advocate:
c/o Philippine Daily Inquirer Chino Roces Avenue corner Yague and Mascardo Streets, Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines Or fax nos. +63 2 8974793 to 94
Advertisement
Advertisement

News

  • Magnitude-7.5 earthquake shakes Mexican capital
  • Title of new Hillary Clinton book: ‘Hard Choices’
  • Filipinos, Dutch re-enact crucifixion of Christ
  • 14 killed in car bombing in Homs
  • 57-nation group plays key Ukraine monitoring role
  • Sports

  • Nadal ousted by Ferrer in Monte Carlo quarters
  • Pacquiao shorts in Bradley fight sold for P1.7M in LA auction
  • Ryu pitches Dodgers past Giants
  • Alonso sets the pace in Chinese GP practice
  • Heat seek Three-peat but Spurs, Pacers top seeds
  • Lifestyle

  • Levine designs womenswear with help from fiancee
  • Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Nobel laureate, dies at 87
  • Ford Mustang turns 50 atop Empire State Building
  • Pro visual artists, lensmen to judge Pagcor’s photo contest
  • ‘Labahita a la bacalao’
  • Entertainment

  • EXO postpones release of mini album ‘Overdose’
  • ‘X-men’ filmmaker slams ‘fabricated’ sex attack claims
  • Singer Chris Brown’s bodyguard on trial in DC
  • Whoopi Goldberg debuts as marijuana columnist
  • ‘X-men’ director accused of sex assault on teen boy
  • Business

  • Italy sells luxury state cars on eBay
  • Asian shares mostly up in quiet trade
  • Dollar up in Asia on US jobs data, Ukraine deal
  • Barbie doll has a problem
  • Oil prices mixed ahead of long Easter weekend
  • Technology

  • Nasa’s moon-orbiting robot crashes down
  • Netizens pay respects to Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  • Nokia recalls 30,000 chargers for Lumia 2520 tablet
  • Facebook rolls out ‘nearby friends’ feature
  • Netizens seethe over Aquino’s ‘sacrifice’ message
  • Opinion

  • Editorial cartoon, April 17, 2014
  • A humbler Church
  • Deepest darkness
  • ‘Agnihotra’ for Earth’s health
  • It’s the Holy Week, time to think of others
  • Global Nation

  • Filipina accomplice arrested for fake bills in Malaysia
  • DoH denies Filipino nurse no longer positive for MERS virus
  • WHO warns vs spread of MERS-Cov, urges vigilance in taking precautions
  • Last call for nominations to ’14 Presidential Awards
  • San Francisco business coalition slams proposed tax on sugary drinks
  • Marketplace