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5 foreigners may face online theft raps

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MANILA, Philippines—Charges were recommended by the National Bureau of Investigation last Friday against what an NBI report said were five Chinese and/or Taiwanese nationals allegedly involved in the online theft of credit card information.

In a June 14 letter to Prosecutor General Claro Arellano, NBI Director Nonnatus Caesar Rojas sought inquest proceedings against Andong Ye, Shizhong Zhou, Wei Sheng, Yantai Luo and Yangfeng Luo, all of 42-3 Forest Rd., Carmenville subdivision in Angeles City.

Rojas recommended that charges for violation of Republic Act No. 8484, the Access Devices Regulation Act of 1998, be filed against the five.

Based on intelligence reports and armed with a search warrant from a court, Rojas said an NBI intelligence team swooped down on the residence of a Mr. Wang in Angeles City to verify information about the place.

Mr. Wang was alleged to be “in collusion” with a Chinese syndicate engaged in fraudulent acts using access devices. But Mr. Wang was not at the house when the NBI team came.

“Intelligence sources revealed this foreign syndicate conducts fraudulent online transactions and steals credit card information through hacking and other malicious representation on the Internet via equipment like telephones, computers, routers, access devices, modems, two-way radios and scripted documents,” said Rojas in a three-page letter to the Department of Justice.

Confiscated from the residence were assorted credit cards, a skimming device, routers, a laptop, modem, printer, telephones and various documents.

“…(M)ere possession of counterfeit access devices, access device equipment or skimming devices without being in the business or employment which lawfully deals with the manufacture, issuance or distribution of such devices is punishable by law,” the NBI chief said.

The five foreigners were allegedly found “in the process of conducting their illegal activities” when the NBI team entered the residence.


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Tags: Credit cards , Mr. Wang , National Bureau of Investigation , online theft , Philippines

  • dani77777

    Drug peddlers, poachers, intruders and thieves.
    Sana huwag nang pabalikin sa Taiwan o China ang mga kriminal dahil noong nakaraan madami na rin tayong nahuli pero pabalik-balik lang yata ang mga ito.
    Make them suffer in Bilibid.

    • avmphil

      These guys are the “enemies of this nation” .A conspiracy between local “destructive elements” on the payroll of Beijing. What I have observed is support also comes from “traitors” outside this country as far as the US and Australia. A clandestine network designed to get Filipinos to fall and abide by the dictates of the Chinese.

      • me@Stanford.edu

        They should all be shot with no mercy. These criminals are all Taiwanese and Chinese. The same sub-human kind stealing the Philippine resources and encrouching the philippine islet territories.

        No exit visa to all foreign felons. Stamp all exit visa denied, then burn all of them. Report them as missing forever.

  • Patikotiko

    Gawing bitay parusa sa drug pushers at life sa gun runners and close our territorial waters to foreign fisherman. Let our local fisherman enjoy our sea bounty.

  • FahKimYang

    What happened to that case against BI lawyers and DOTC officials that facilitated the ‘escape’ of a Korean criminal back to Korea? Mga bossing, may bagong customers na naman!

  • avmphil

    Put them snakes for long periods behind bars. A mandatory requirement such as ”caning” for crimes against the country will be a deterrent. Strange we continue to nab foreign criminals of a “higher” calibre rather than local petty perpetrators in this context.

  • md’c™

    No mercy for these slit eyed mørøn møngøløid chinx. Burn them alive with concentrated sulfuric acid and then Guillotine them in public grandstand, and send their sh¡ts back to which ever sh¡thøle they came from.

    The same chinx stole my amex card number back in the states. It was found out by amex that there were fraudulent charges way out in hongkong and chinxland. They should be given no mercy, not even a minute of time.

    Do you know why we have too many foreign tourist (legal and illegals) criminals in this country? We allow them. All perverts and sex maniacs of the west, east and persia are roaming around our streets, provinces and malate/ermita manila.

    A new enhanced bill must be established and passed for IP, frauds, racketeering, sex crimes and human trafficking to include:
    - No exit visa pass to all foreign criminals. Exit denied.
    - No second chance, No mercy.
    - Automatic jail in sh¡thole town with no bail and no lawyer time allowed.
    - Automatic verdict of guilty, and a Choice of public place Guillotine or burn alive in concentrated sulfuric acid to die.

    The rest of foreign criminals will leave town for sure.

    • avmphil

      A disgusting humanoid bent on “thievery” especially to those whom had given them; shelter, a home, and a way of life beyond expectation in their own so called “father land” A desperado tribal misfits, that see all evil among mankind except their own kind. This system must give them a punishment that will stick like a scar in their criminal heads.

    • vendetta07

      the chinese are clearly wrong, but there is no need for language like that, friend.

      • md’c™

        Pardon my language for publishing it to the world. Its the high intensity adrenaline based on experience driving it. It spiraled with no break. They always do it here in the heartland. They are repeat violators. Strong language is what they need and they get it from me.

        Maybe you have not experienced receiving a surprised $100,000.00+ balance on your credit card and all 3 major credit bureaus reporting you to all creditors, and some already cancelled your accounts.

        What else would you give them, love and shelter? I dont think so.

      • vendetta07

        there are over a billion chinese in the world so statistically it’s not hard to find a few bad apples. it applies to all races.

        If you don’t like Chinese fine, don’t let me stop you, but using language like that doesn’t bring many people to your side.

  • Guest

    Tuoi Tre News, 17 June 2013

    Beware Your Luggage May Be Stolen In Mid-air

    On April 19, three passengers fell prey to thieves during their flight from Singapore to Cambodia.

    Shortly after their Silk Air flight, coded MI 602, landed at Phnom Penh International Airport, three Singaporean passengers discovered that they had lost more than $3,000, according to The New Paper. Two Chinese nationals were suspected, according to eyewitnesses, but a search conducted by Cambodian police later found nothing on them.

    However, Xu Chang Kai, 47, of Chinese nationality, was later arrested and charged with the theft on May 1, The New Paper said.

    Chinese nationals dominate the list of thieves and suspects on the recently reported airplane cases. For instance, two Chinese men allegedly stole money and other assets from passengers on a Vietnam Airlines flight on October 29, 2012 by
    rummaging through their luggage.

    The two men repeatedly walked up and down the aisle and searched the portable luggage of other passengers, according to one of the passengers on flight VN593 from Hong Kong to Hanoi.

    The eyewitness said the Chinese men took advantage of the fact that most of the passengers had fallen asleep during the long five-hour flight, and “even opened some of the bags.” A Japanese passenger in seat 32C said he lost thousands of US dollars.

    • md’c™

      In the US, Russian and East European dominate credit card frauds followed by Chinese and Taiwan nationals.

      In the Philippines, the Taiwanese and Chinese (Illegals and tourists) renting home-office with a high speed internet, multiple VoIP lines, a few cheap PCs and card printers. Buoy, I am in the wrong business.

      Where do they get the VoIP numbers, from Europe and the US. They bring the VoIP equipment with them, plug it to a router and now, its a local US number calling and trapping US credit card numbers. Its big business, a multi billion dollar ring. Visa/MC and Amex reported it as over $2b losses.)

      • spiritnsoul700

        This isn’t new, These syndicates has been operating forging/cloning of Lost/stolen credit cards for donkey years

        Back then any lost/stolen credit cards found its way to local syndicates who then sent to certain destination abroad , who are the experts cloning credit cards

        This is going to be a surprise for you here, These credit cards are then used as well in purchasing expensive items abroad where the law on fraud credit card isn’t strict. And these “credit card holders” does not necessary has to be members from the syndicate.

        They does engage/employ ” outsiders” who are in dire strait of earning fast cash and are carefully screened before they are been engaged. How does these lost/stolen credit card found its way to Hong Kong? interesting question…. it was sent by your local triad/syndicates and even Filipinos has been engaged/employed “credit card holders besides other nationalities as well.

        Flight tickets to specific destination selected by these syndicate besides accommodation and food are provided ( Big business you are right ), Once you touch down at the specific selected destination, members of the syndicates will take you to their hideout and each day you are required to shop at high end exclusive place, using the fraud credit card,

        The items are then packed and couriered back.The credit card holder earns about 10% per day from the total “purchase, In two months time he/she return back home with plenty of cash to spare and to spend .An eye opener for you and for your Filipino journalists who are still in the dark and not up to date with the trend of what reality is beyond the shore of The Philippines ( many times your journalists posted inaccurate/incorrect infos on some of the world news ) , Your local crime triad/syndicate does have link/connection with other countries crime triad/syndicates, just as cops around the globe interact and work togather to flush out criminals, these criminal syndicates co- operate with each other across the globe as well.

        An example , when you land in Europe, “members” of the syndicates will be there to meet and fetch you to their hideout. they are professionals buddy.

        Penny for your thought

      • md’c™

        its a syndicate, it can be anything. use it, sell it, flaunt it, resell and recycle, the cycle goes on. its big business for the criminals and its been going on for many years. However, during the internet revolution, they went high tech too and they write their own codes to capture card number by piggy backing and eves dropping. The russians and east euro criminals are the most high tech writing their own codes – captured ring members in brooklyn in new york. lately, they put monitors and capture terminals right on ATM machines and busy storefronts. Its a mad world out there. Since they stole my amex 5 years ago raking over $100,000 and destroy my credit history with all the 3 major credit bureaus, I made sure all my online shopping are thru secured servers only while physical purchases are mostly cash. It sure did me big. Maybe it was for the better. I took it as a big lesson in security.

      • spiritnsoul700

        The monitor device placed hidden on ATM machine is out of date method now buddy.

        You need to be careful when you made withdrawal specially from ATM machine, Right now the recent theft discoveryis that they just need to insert “card” after you had made withdrawal/deposit to capture your numbers, /In the card there is a detecting chip to collect your saving data, But the catch is they only has some few seconds to do it,

        so what you should do is, do not immediately leave away from the ATM machine, instead stay put for a few second by keep pressing the cancel and stop button , then you leaves, or quietly 7 seconds.

        Another safer method is instead of using credit card, make more use oof debit card instead than credit card and it also help consumers to budget and to spend within means

      • md’c™

        Thats the east euro/russian data capture using an atm built-in microchip which is standard in europe. But, it can only happen if the file still open. ATMs in No America is a transaction at a time only and transaction closes after a command is sent unless it requires an ack else its nak. And in No America, the atm card will not come out until a transaction is completed. There ain’t no info to catch since there is no memory cache other than at the host during a transaction. Most of the ATMs here in Metro Manila has lag time since they’re much slower than most no american ATMs. With BDO, the host reads your card and spits it out before a transaction commences. I cannot recall any cache built after one transaction so there is no way to catch any data like you said. Its all host data and no cache at ATM memory is kept, so its far fetch.

        Last ploy from thieves were dual cameras in corner spots taking shots at user using atms in the hope to catch the card face and back.

      • spiritnsoul700

        It has been reported in some countries including in your nieghoring countries as well, No syndicates even in Asean were to take dual picture in hidden corner spots ever since it had been exposed, they will always keep changing their tactics and they are very inventive as well coming up new methods That method of dual cameras in corner spots has been exposed some in even countries like Singapore and Malaysia,

        If hackers and professional thieves can hack into government secrets and even into top secret files of the FBI and CIA , what makes you think it is impossible ….. In today modern world it is about technology war between theft/crime vs technology law enforcement. it is not impossible to crack even the most densely most safest code

        a world professional thief does not have to be present at the banks to steal your savings. all he need is to get your personal bank data and from there he just works at his pace in his hideout and hack to transfer your saving outs to a “dummy” account. A dummy account is to distract tracking to the eventual recipient.

  • joboni96

    intsik switik na naman

    ikulong na mga iyan at
    paigtingin immigration control



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