Quantcast
Latest Stories

UN: World population to reach 8.1 billion in 2025


In this Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011 photo, commuters disembark from trains at a train station in Mumbai. A new UN report is forecasting that the world’s population will increase from 7.2 billion today to 8.1 billion in 2025 and 9.6 billion in 2050. The report said much of the overall increase between now and 2050 is expected to take place in Africa and countries with large populations such as India, Indonesia, Pakistan, the Philippines and the United States. AP PHOTO/RAFIQ MAQBOOL

UNITED NATIONS —A new UN report is forecasting that the world’s population will increase from 7.2 billion today to 8.1 billion in 2025 and 9.6 billion in 2050.

The report, released Thursday, said most of the population growth will occur in developing regions which are projected to increase from 5.9 billion in 2013 to 8.2 billion in 2050.

During that same period, it said, the population of developed countries is expected to remain largely unchanged at around 1.3 billion people.

The report said much of the overall increase between now and 2050 is expected to take place in Africa and countries with large populations such as India, Indonesia, Pakistan, the Philippines and the United States.

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United Nations forecast Thursday that the world’s population will increase from 7.2 billion today to 8.1 billion in 2025, with most growth in developing countries and more than half in Africa. By 2050, it will reach 9.6 billion.

India’s population is expected to surpass China’s around 2028 when both countries will have populations of around 1.45 billion, according to the report on “World Population Prospects.”  While India’s population is forecast to grow to around 1.6 billion and then slowly decline to 1.5 billion in 2100, China’s is expected to start decreasing after 2030, possibly falling to 1.1 billion in 2100, it said.

The report found global fertility rates are falling rapidly, though not nearly fast enough to avoid a significant population jump over the next decades. In fact, the UN revised its population projection upward since its last report two years ago, mostly due to higher fertility projections in the countries with the most children per women. The previous projection had the global population reaching 9.3 billion people in 2050.

John Wilmoth, director of the Population Division in the UN’s Department of Economic and Social Affairs, said the projected population increase will pose challenges but is not necessarily cause for alarm. Rather, he said, the worry is for countries on opposite sides of two extremes:  Countries, mostly poor ones, whose populations are growing too quickly, and wealthier ones where the populations is aging and decreasing.

“The world has had a great experience of dealing with rapid population growth,” Wilmoth said at a news conference. “World population doubled between 1960 and 2000, roughly. World food supply more than doubled over that time period.”

“The problem is more one of extremes,” he added. “The main story is to avoid the extreme of either rapid growth due to high fertility or rapid population aging and potential decline due to very low fertility.”

Among the fastest-growing countries is Nigeria, whose population is expected to surpass the US population before the middle of the century and could start to rival China as the second most populous country in the world by the end of the century, according to the report. By 2050, Nigeria’s population is expected to reach more than 440 million people, compared to about 400 million for the US. The oil-rich African country’s population is forecast to be nearly 914 million by 2100.

The report found that most countries with very high levels of fertility—more than 5 children per women—are on the UN list of least developed countries. Most are in Africa, but they also include Afghanistan and East Timor.

But the average number of children per woman has swiftly declined in several large countries, including China, India, Indonesia, Iran, Brazil and South Africa, leading to a reduction in population growth rates in much of the developing world.

In contrast, many European and eastern Asia countries have very low fertility levels.

“As a result, these populations are aging rapidly and face challenges in providing care and support to their growing ranks of older persons,” Wilmoth said.

Wilmoth cautioned that “there is a great deal of uncertainty about population trends.” He said projections could change based on the trajectories of three major components—fertility, mortality and migration.

Still, population growth until 2050 is all but inevitable.

The UN uses the “medium-variant” projection, which assumes a substantial reduction in the fertility levels of intermediate- and high-fertility countries in the coming years. In the “high-variant”—if women on average had an extra half of a child—the world population would reach 10.9 billion in 2050. In the “low-variant”—if women on average had half a child fewer—the population would be 8.3 billion in 2050.

Among the notable findings in the report:

— The population in developing regions is projected to increase from 5.9 billion in 2013 to 8.2 billion in 2050. In contrast, the population of developed countries is expected to remain largely unchanged during that period, at around 1.3 billion people.

— Africa’s population could increase from 1.1 billion today to 2.4 billion in 2050, and potentially to 4.2 billion by 2100.

— The number of children in less developed regions is at all time high at 1.7 billion. In those regions, children under age 15 account for 26 percent of the population. In the poorest countries, children constitute 40 percent of their populations, posing huge challenges for providing education and employment.

— In wealthier regions, by contrast, children account for 16 percent of the population. In developed countries as a whole, the number of older people has already surpassed the number of children, and by 2050 the number of older people will be nearly twice the number of children.

— Low-fertility countries now include all of Europe except Iceland plus 19 countries in Asia, 17 in the Americas, two in Africa and one in Oceania.

— The populations of several countries are expected to decline by more than 15 percent by 2050, including Belarus, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cuba, Georgia, Latvia, Lithuania, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russia Serbia, and Ukraine.

— Life expectancy at birth for the world as a whole rose from 47 years in 1950-55 to 69 years in 2005-2010 and is projected to reach 76 years in 2045-2050 and 82 years in 2095-2100.— Edith M. Lederer with  Alexandra Olson 


Follow Us


Follow us on Facebook Follow on Twitter Follow on Twitter


Recent Stories:

Complete stories on our Digital Edition newsstand for tablets, netbooks and mobile phones; 14-issue free trial. About to step out? Get breaking alerts on your mobile.phone. Text ON INQ BREAKING to 4467, for Globe, Smart and Sun subscribers in the Philippines.

Tags: Global Nation , UN , World Population

  • NAGMAMARUNONG

    now with 7 billion to feed, these chinese have to reach out POACHING for food. anyway, they are backed by their military. tibet,india, vietnam, japan, philippines and even competing with taiwan to fill their gnawing stomachs.

    • kanoy

      CHINA IS IN THE 21ST CENTURY RP REMAINS IN 1945—TECHNOLOGY WHICH THE R[P CALLS ”CONFUSING” AS IT DOES DNA–WILL ALLOW CHINA TO ”CALL” THE FISH TO CHINESE WATERS ALLOWING FILIPINO TO CONTINUE POACHING AND DESTROYING ITS OWN REEFS LOOKING FOR FISH WHICH HAVE MOVED TO CHINESE ARTIFICIAL REEFS

      SOTTO AND ENRILE ARE SO STUPID>>>the world’s population will increase from 7.2 billion today to 8.1 billion in 2025
      WHILE EVERY NATION HAS SOME FORM OF RH BILL THE 2 IDIOTS AND THEIR RCC COHORTS WANT TO CALL A ”POPULATION CONTROL” BILL—-DUHHHH THEY DID THE SAME THING WITH THE MAGNA CARTER—WHAT HAPPENED WITH THAT SCARE TACTIC? FIZZZZZZZZZLE

      • RedRose_13

        ang tanda mo na pala… may-isip ka na noong 1945? Halimbawa 20 years old ka noong 1945, 20+55+13 = 88 ka na!!!! contemporary mo si Manong Johnny!!!!

    • alex ca

      Ngayon nga e nasa newspaper na makukulang na ang kanilang ouput sa agriculture at kailangan na nila ng import ng maramihan. Sa ngayon kakalabanin pa nila ang ibang bansa dahil sa pagpakita nila ng kaplastikan mag antay sila baka sasusunod maging cannibal na ang mga yan. Tao na ang kakainin noon fetus lang sa susunod tao na

  • Hey_Dudes

    China has more than a billion human beings followed by another prolific baby making machinery called Made in India. If we keep on acquiescing to the CBCP bishops and their barkers on the need of Filipinos making more babies, we will the world’s 4th billionaries soon.

    • kanoy

      CHINA HAS A 1 CHILD POLICY
      RP HAS A ”CAN’T AFFORD 1 CHILD SO I WILL HAVE 10” POLICY

      • Hey_Dudes

        Right on…ha…ha…ha.

      • alex ca

        kanoy wag mong ikumpara ang China sa Pinas. Kasi ang Pinas ay demokratikong bansa di kagaya ng China communist kung baga wala kang karapatang mabuhay kung nandoon ka. Bakit cannot afford? Kung ang tao ay nagpupursige na magkaroon ng pagkakakitaan mabubuhay kahit maraming anak. Depende lang yun sa parents kung pabaya o makikinig sa ibang tao kaysa kanyang pamilya dapat hindi na siya nagpamilya.

      • RedRose_13

        sssshhhh, kasi minsan ang kalibugan ang nangunguna kaysa dapat pag-isipan kung dagdag pa ng anak.

      • RedRose_13

        China has to do it dahil sa exponential na pagdami ng population nila. Tayo sa liit ng bans natin, hindi natin kakayahin ang mabilis na pagdami, at isa pang contributing factor ito ng pagiging poor natin. It is okay to have 10 kids if the family can afford to sustain QUALITY OF LIFE. Quantity without quality is not a good idea.

  • boybakal

    UN: World population to reach 8.1 billion in 2025

    With the way the Philippine population is growing, we will have one billion contribution
    to Wold Population by 2025.

    • kanoy

      THE WAY THE RCC VIEWS IT 1 PISO TITHE EACH KATOLIK EACH DAY 1 BILLION KATOLIK PINOY=HIGH PRICE LAWYER TO DEFEND PEDOPHILE PRIESTS

      • RedRose_13

        isa pang exaggerated, alam mo ba kung gaano kalaki ang 1 billion? ala, eyyy, ang pinoy niyan patong-patong na sa pagtulog.

    • RedRose_13

      ang labo ng math mo. let’s say sa 2013 = 98 million, average 5 million a year, 12 years from now estimate 60 million ang dadagdag, so 98+60 = 158 million lang, isali mo na yung namamatay sa hirap pati na mga matatanda, me reklamo ka sa 158 million, o, sige from 158 to 300, me angal ka pa? 400 million na kaya, me angal pa? ang 400 million iba sa 1 billion, ito, huh, basahi mo ng maigi…
      400,000,000 million…
      1,000,000,000 billion…

      matagal pa bago tayo mag 1 billion, huwak ka masyalo imbento ako galit iyo!!!!



Copyright © 2014, .
To subscribe to the Philippine Daily Inquirer newspaper in the Philippines, call +63 2 896-6000 for Metro Manila and Metro Cebu or email your subscription request here.
Factual errors? Contact the Philippine Daily Inquirer's day desk. Believe this article violates journalistic ethics? Contact the Inquirer's Reader's Advocate. Or write The Readers' Advocate:
c/o Philippine Daily Inquirer Chino Roces Avenue corner Yague and Mascardo Streets, Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines Or fax nos. +63 2 8974793 to 94
Advertisement
Advertisement

News

  • Camilla’s brother dies in US after head injury
  • Luisita farmers storm DAR compound
  • Trillanes, Ejercito confident they are not in Napoles’ list
  • Easterlies to prevail in Luzon, Visayas
  • Lacson eyes P106-B ‘Yolanda’ rehab masterplan
  • Sports

  • Mixers trim Aces; Painters repulse Bolts
  • Donaire junks Garcia as coach, taps father
  • ’Bye Ginebra: No heavy heart this time
  • UAAP board tackles new rules
  • Baguio climb to decide Le Tour de Filipinas
  • Lifestyle

  • Photos explore dynamics of youths’ sexual identity
  • 12th Philippine Food Expo set at the World Trade Center
  • No tourist draw, Malang the croc will remain wild
  • The best flavors of summer in one bite, and more
  • Homemade yogurt, bread blended with pizza, even ramen
  • Entertainment

  • Sony developing live-action Barbie comedy
  • California court won’t review Jackson doctor case
  • Return of ‘Ibong Adarna’
  • Practical Phytos plans his future
  • In love … with acting
  • Business

  • Facebook profits triple as mobile soars
  • Insular Honors Sales Performers at Testimonial Rites
  • Apple increases stock buyback, will split stock
  • Cost-recovery provisions for affected gencos urged
  • This time, BIR goes after florists
  • Technology

  • Top Traits of Digital Marketers
  • No truth to viral no-visa ‘chronicles’
  • ‘Unlimited’ Internet promos not really limitless; lawmakers call for probe
  • Viber releases new design for iPhone, comes to Blackberry 10 for the first time
  • Engineers create a world of difference
  • Opinion

  • Editorial cartoon, April 24, 2014
  • Talking to Janet
  • Respite
  • Bucket list
  • JPII in 1981: walking a tightrope
  • Global Nation

  • Filipinos in Middle East urged to get clearance before returning
  • PH seeks ‘clearer assurance’ from US
  • China and rivals sign naval pact to ease maritime tensions
  • What Went Before: Manila bus hostage crisis
  • Obama arrives in Tokyo, first stop of 4-nation tour
  • Marketplace