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Bantay OCW (Ang Boses ng OFW)

The issue of child support

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Amanda came to Bantay OCW at Radyo Inquirer to complain that her husband, an overseas Filipino worker (OFW), had another family and had stopped supporting his original family.

According to Amanda, her husband, Ernie, began a relationship with another OFW in Jordan. The woman had even sent a text message to Amanda saying that Ernie was feeling lonely and she took care of him to lessen his sadness. This was said as if Amanda should be thankful for the role the woman was playing in her husband’s life—a caregiver and joygiver.

While in Jordan from 2004-2011, Ernie totally cut off communication with Amanda and their children. One day, Amanda received news that someone saw her husband walking out of the Manila airport with two children in tow, an infant in his arms and another woman by his side.

It was several months before Ernie contacted his original family but only his oldest son got the chance to see him. The boy went to his new house and met his new family. Soon after that, his support for his first family came to a complete halt.

Recently, Amanda heard  her husband had gone to Nigeria for another overseas contract.

Amanda is deeply hurt not only because her husband now has another family but also because of Ernie’s lack of responsibility for their children.

As a mother, the only thing she’s asking for is child support. Their oldest son will be attending college soon.

We persuaded Amanda to get an information sheet from Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) and find out the real location of her husband, as well as some of the details of her husband’s contract for his work in Nigeria, if indeed he working there. Bantay OCW is still trying to get any other information about Amanda’s husband and we are also calling out to Ernie not to use migration as a way of escaping his duties and responsibilities to his family.

***

Susan Andes, aka Susan K. is on board at Radyo Inquirer 990 dzIQ AM, Monday to Friday 11:00 a.m.-12:00 noon & 12:30-2:00 p.m. with audio/video live streaming: www.dziq.am Studio: 2/F MRP Bldg., Mola St., cor. Pasong Tirad St., Makati City. Helpline: 0927.649.9870; E-mail: susankbantayocw@yahoo.com/bantayocwfoundation@yahoo.com


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  • tra6Gpeche

    If there is no legal divorce, why would there be alimony? Ernie is free not to send financial support to his former family. It will be up to his conscience. If he does not feel guilty, then don’t expect anything from him. And this is normal in the Philippines!

    • danielmondejar

      Divorce or no divorce alimony is a must. It is not up to “his Conscience” Ernie must give his financial support or alimony to his former family.

      • ARIKUTIK

        Para tuloy ang ligaya ni kompare.

      • tra6Gpeche

        If Ernie does not have conscience, how could anyone force him to give financial support? There is no Philippine alimony law obligating him to support his children from the first marriage. A person without conscience will never feel guilty or remorse in abandoning his first wife and children. This is very common here in the Philippines.

      • Martin

        Alimony is a US term describing the legal obligation of a MAN to take of his family. Women can have a salary, theirs is their ownmoney, but a man has to give HIS money to his family, OR ELSE.
        This is still the law, despite able bodied women having EXCTLY the same opportunities to work as men. Alimony treats women like children.

      • tra6Gpeche

        That is for the US. For us here, no such thing.

      • kanoy

        THE RP HAS NO SUCH LAW THAT STIPULATES THAT

  • Pinaslover

    He is committed by law to send financial support to his legitimate children. Pwede pa nga nyang kasuhan ang husband nya ng concubinage kung di ako nagkakamali kasi may binabahay na pala at may mga anak pa.

    • kanoy

      NAME THAT LAW????????

  • Diepor

    This is one of the problem the philippines have because of the church. In other countrys she could have a divorce and the court could force the guy to pay support for his children. If he refused to pay the goverment could take the money directly from his salary.

  • http://twitter.com/ZALZANZIBAR ALBERTO ZALAZAR

    Nasa DUGO yata ng karamihan ng PINOY ay babaero O PLAYBOY (dami ng chickas)…left & right…anak sa loob …anak sa labas…sinabi mo pa…!
    …Well,..Chick boy ka dahil kaya mo.. di ba?…Playboy ka dahil Astig ka… di ba?…
    …gusto mong ipakita sa lahat na matapang ka…!
    …Pero …Huwag na huwag mong kalimutan ang mga anak mo…sa loob man O sa Labas…! ikaw lang ang inaasahan nila…!…suportahan mo ang mga anak mo…! yon lang…!

    • Pio Gante

      dre, pati mga pinay player din:))

  • Martin

    The government must stay out of family life, it is NONE of their business.

    • resortman

      The government is there in support af every family, being the basic sector of society thats why we have the Family Code to protect and ensure bounderies of family legal issues. Although governments works to govern as a whole, family concerns matter in such governance.

      • Martin

        Whenever the central state interferes in families , you can be sure that things will be much much worse, the state wants to increase it’s power and increase taxes. Nearly all taxes are paid by men and largeely distributed to females, expect more and more abuse of men and fathers in the future.

      • resortman

        Cmon.., dont be too macho..give to Ceazar what is Caezar’s..the government is run by men, how can they abuse themselves? besides, i believe in equality of man, gender or othrwise…thats why there are laws crafted for the protection and support of the family…kung wala kamo eh ano na tayo lalo?..?

      • Martin

        Governments are run to benefit the elite patriarchy (and a handful of women) yes, but 99% of men have zero power and little wealth.

        Such laws are made for chivalrous reasons and to maximise the work, tax intake from the 99% males. The laws are supposed to be gender equal, but the reality is that the central state and elite want men to work, women to look after families. There was nothing wrong with that in the PAST, but nowadays, EVERY law made favours females and NOT males, so men are in a terrible position. We are losing more and more of our RIGHTS every year but our obligations are still the same, for women they are getting more and more rights but with no extra obligations.

        In western countries males pay between 70 and 80% of the income tax, the government spends most of this on females, despite “gender equality”. In the Philippines it will be the same.

        Justice for men and boys.

    • kanoy

      THE GVT SHOULD MAKE IT THEIR BUSINESS BY PASSING LAWS THAT GO AFTER THESE DEAD BEAT SPERM DONORS WHO FORCE THE WIFE TO HAVE 5-10 KIDS BUT REFUSE TO SUPPORT THEM

      THE WIFE SHOULD BY LAW BE ABLE TO GARNISH THE HUSBANDS WAGES NO MATTER WHERE IN THE WORLD HE WORKS
      HEAR THAT MANNY PACQUIAO YOU SHOULD PAY FOR YOUR LOVE CHILD

      • Martin

        Women have contraceptives available BEFORE sex, DURING sex, AFTER sex ( all invented by men) , but for men there are only contraceptives during sex. Strange that ?

        Many many women become pregnant deliberately, women sleeping with rich, famous men especially, it is an easy free way to huge wealth for talentless females. Women also lie aboutwho the real father of babies are, in USA men who dispute being the father find that 30% of the time, they are NOT the father in DNA tests. It will almost certainlybe the same inPhilippines. ALL men should check that they are not the victims of paternity fraud by women



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