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Australia’s Cassius reclaims world’s biggest croc crown

This handout photo taken on May 19, 2010 and received on February 12, 2013 shows Toody Scott feeding Cassius – who has reclaimed his crown as the world’s biggest crocodile in captivity, with his Australian handler saying it will boost business, on Green Island, Queensland. The 5.48-metre (17 ft 11ins) crocodile, kept in a park on an island off Australia’s Queensland, held the record until “Lolong”, a 6.17-metre suspected man-eater, was caught in the Philippines 17 months ago. But with Lolong’s death from a mystery illness on Sunday, Cassius is once again on top. “The Guinness Book of World Records contacted us as soon as Lolong died,” Billy Craig, a croc wrangler at Marineland Melanesia where Cassius lives, told AFP. AFP / MARINELAND MELANESIA

SYDNEY—”Cassius” has reclaimed his crown as the world’s biggest crocodile in captivity after his rival for the title died, with the huge reptile’s handler in Australia saying Tuesday it will boost business.

The 5.48-meter (17 ft 11ins) crocodile, kept in a park on an island off Australia’s Queensland, held the record until “Lolong,” a 6.17-meter suspected man-eater, was caught in the Philippines 17 months ago.

But with Lolong’s death from a mystery illness on Sunday, Cassius is once again on top.

“The Guinness Book of World Records contacted us as soon as Lolong died,” Billy Craig, a croc wrangler at Marineland Melanesia where Cassius lives, told AFP.

“They said the record will revert back to us. It’s definitely good for business.

“We changed the sign to the largest crocodile in captivity in Australia, so I guess we can now just remove the Australia part and put it back to the whole world,” he added.

A government-sanctioned hunting party caught Lolong, believed to be around 50 years old, near the town of Bunawan in the country’s remote south in September 2011 after it was suspected of biting the head off a young schoolgirl and of eating a fisherman.

Its capture made the town famous and Lolong, named after a local crocodile hunter, became a big tourist attraction.

Cassius, estimated to be 110 years old, has been in captivity for 26 years, having been caught in a Northern Territory river after attacking boats and biting off outboard motors.

He was sold to George Craig, who trucked him 3,000 kilometers (1,860 miles) to Green Island on the Great Barrier Reef where he founded Marineland Melanesia.

Billy Craig said it was a pity Lolong died so young, with a potential 50 years of growth ahead.

“It’s a real shame. Imagine what size it could have grown to in another 50 years,” he said.


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  • dexter ngayan

    di kasi naalagaan si lolong ng maayos, sayang naman. 

  • Milesaway

    Sayang naka break ang Senado kung hindi malaking investigasyon namana ang pagka naman ni Lolong!!!

  • avmphil

    Even ‘Lolong’ is not safe in this country. And the Australian ‘guy’ is drawing more attention and more ‘pera’ for its keepers. Thank goodness… ‘Lolong’s ‘ meat and hide is not sold to anyone in Binondo.

  • Phenoy

    I wonder if the handlers of Lolong were in any way qualified to handle a crocodile his size. Are they animal experts? Lolongs pond was made of concrete, which allows any kind of toxins or bacteria to stay rather than be absorbed in the ground. Next time, if they catch another crocodile like Lolong, they should approximate the natural habitat of the animal. Because concrete is the material used in your house doesn’t mean its appropriate for crocodiles (maybe human crocodiles but that’s another story).

  • isprikitoy

    Please imbestigador in aide of legislation…hehehehehehe

  • Yobhtron

    Pinakain kasi ng nga double dead na mga hayop at kung ano-ano pa kaya namatay.  Dapat dinala na lang iyon sa Malabon Zoo baka nagtagal pa.

  • libra25

    I feel that Lolong was a victim of neglect.  He should have been properly monitored by qualified animal experts. The local government was just pre-occupied by expanding the premises of the park.  Lolong deserves a better treatment than just an oversized pool. Someone should be held liable for his death. :(

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_44QGTQXFYHNVPNMX453LWBPMXM Opel

    Too bad only if crocodiles in the government would die easily like lolong, d na kailangan ipreserve sunugin na lang carcass

  • http://twitter.com/Olibo2 Olibo

    If Australia has Cassius croc Philippines should name the next supercroc Pacman. Or Marquez……



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