Stampede after fireworks kills 61 in Ivory Coast

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ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast—A crowd stampeded after leaving a New Year’s fireworks show early Tuesday in Ivory Coast’s main city, killing 61 people—many of them children and teenagers—and injuring more than 200, rescue workers said.

Thousands had gathered at the Felix Houphouet Boigny Stadium in Abidjan’s Plateau district to see the fireworks. It was only the second New Year’s Eve fireworks display since peace returned to this West African nation after a bloody upheaval over presidential elections put the nation on the brink of civil war and turned this city into a battle zone.

With 2013 showing greater promise, people were in the mood to celebrate on New Year’s Eve. Families brought children and they watched the rockets burst in the nighttime sky. But only an hour into the new year, as the crowds poured onto the Boulevard de la Republic after the show, something caused a stampede, said Col. Issa Sako of the fire department rescue team. How so many deaths occurred on the broad boulevard and how the tragedy started is likely to be the subject of an investigation.

Many of the younger ones in the crowd went down, trampled underfoot. Most of those killed were between 8 and 15 years old

“The flood of people leaving the stadium became a stampede which led to the deaths of more than 60 and injured more than 200,” Sako told Ivory Coast state TV.

Desperate parents went to the city morgue, the hospital and to the stadium to try to find missing children. Mamadou Sanogo was searching for his 9-year-old son, Sayed.

“I have just seen all the bodies, but I cannot find my son,” said a tearful Sanogo. “I don’t know what to do.”

State TV showed a woman sobbing in the back of an ambulance; another was bent over on the side of the street, apparently in pain; and another, barely conscious and wearing only a bra on her upper body, was hoisted by rescuers. There were also scenes of small children being treated in a hospital. One boy grimaced in pain and a girl with colored braids in her hair lay under a blanket with one hand bandaged. The death toll could rise, officials said.

After the sun came up, soldiers were patrolling the site that was littered with victims’ clothes, shoes, torn sandals and other belongings. President Alassane Ouattara and his wife, Dominique, visited some of the injured in the hospital. Mrs. Ouattara leaned over one child who was on a bed in a crowded hospital ward and tried to console the youngster. The president pledged that the government would pay for their treatment, his office said.

The government organized the fireworks to celebrate Ivory Coast’s peace, after several months of political violence in early 2011 following disputed elections.

This is not Ivory Coast’s first stadium tragedy. In 2009, 22 people died and over 130 were injured in a stampede at a World Cup qualifying match at the Houphouet Boigny Stadium, prompting FIFA, soccer’s global governing body, to impose a fine of tens of thousands of dollars on Ivory Coast’s soccer federation. The stadium, which officially holds 35,000, was overcrowded at the time of the disaster.

A year later, two people were killed and 30 wounded in a stampede at a municipal stadium during a reggae concert in Bouake, the country’s second-largest city. The concert was organized in the city, held by rebels at the time, to promote peace and reconciliation.

Ivory Coast is the world’s largest cocoa producer, growing more than 37 percent of the world’s annual crop of cocoa beans, which are used to make chocolate.

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  • kanoy

     KILLERS WALK FREE
    PhilSports Stadium stampede
    February 4, 2006. It killed 78 people and injured about 400
    On January 29, 2008, the Supreme Court ruled with finality dismissing ABS-CBN’s case of junking the investigation by the Department of Justice. Hence after 2 years of ABS-CBN’s blocking of closure to the event, the DOJ can now indict all of those involved in the stampede except for Revillame
    5 YEARS AFTER THE SC RULING THERE HAVE BEEN NO INDICTMENTS…TRIALS…JUSTICE…NOW THIS MEDIA POINTS FINGERS AT THE IVORY COAST?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1405060221 Fearless Gara

    The lesson we learned from this tragedies, it is much better to stay at home during New Years day!

    • kanoy

       Then a mudslide wipes out your house you are trapped inside thinking….damn if only i went to that new years party

  • WeAry_Bat

    Perhaps in stadiums and roads crowded with people, there should be diagonal walls to break up a straight line.  Ticket booths have a winding line at 180 angles but is a bit tedious.

    The principle is to break up space into only 5-10 people at a time.  This would keep any pressing force to a smaller level.

    • kanoy

       SOCCER FANS,,,are a crazy lot seen videos of Spain Brazil, UK….They tear those walls down like someone yelled fire and everyone was going in all directions to get out,,,win or lose seems not to matter,,,,think HOCKEY is #2

      • WeAry_Bat

         Ok..  Maybe used buses which can be opened on the exit side of the flow, and are parked diagonally.

        For stadiums, perhaps a rearrangement of the seating pattern so that there is no straight path.  Going over seats has probably one body partially crossing over another body, so it is a little ok.

      • kanoy

         LOL HAVE YOU EVER BEEN IN ONE OF THOSE MELEE’S? I HAVE,,KNOW WHAT WE DID? STAYED PUT….WE WAS SAFE EVERYONE WAS JAMMING THE EXITS..NONE KILLED BUT MANY HURT

  • billy gunner

    “something caused a stampede, said Col. Issa Sako”

    pangalan pa lang, murderer na!

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