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Aman Futures scam ex-agent: ‘No one robbed, everybody happy’–at first

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MANUEL AMALILIO: Suspected mastermind disappears. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

MANILA, Philippines—“It was like a fiesta and everybody was happy,” a former agent of Aman Futures Group Inc. said of the early days of the company behind the multibillion peso scam that victimized up to 15,000 people from the Visayas and Mindanao.

Donna Coyme, who voluntarily submitted her statement to the National Bureau of Investigation and is now under protective custody, recalled how “bundles of cash in millions were being brought in and out of banks, sometimes in transparent plastic bags. But no one was robbed, everybody was happy.”

Because of the large number of bank transactions involving the Aman group, “the banks allotted dedicated tellers and desks for its investors,” she added.

Coyme told reporters that Aman Futures Group managers Fernando and Nimfa Luna would often ask her to stay after she had tutored their children, so she was able to witness transactions even beyond office hours.

Big vault

The investors would bring their money to the Luna house “because banks were already closed,” she explained, adding that “the money were placed in a big vault inside the house.”

Asked where all that money came from, Coyme said that “investors, particularly the small ones, (would) take out loans from cooperatives and ask their relatives working abroad to borrow money and invest (in the company).”

She added that investors took out loans from local cooperatives that charged interest, thinking that the interest could easily be covered by the huge returns being offered by the Aman Group.

 

Mostly teachers

“Many people’s cooperatives have closed down,” Coyme said, “because members … could (no longer) make the payments.”

She said that due to her personal relationship with the Lunas, she was considered a VIP.

“I do not have to line up, and can come and go anytime inside the office,” she added.

But Coyme denied being the financial manager of the company, although she admitted being an agent representing at least 300 Aman investors, most of them teachers.

She admitted having profited from the company’s scheme, but said she also lost all her money “because it was reinvested using (her) relatives’ names.”

Still, Coyme said, “I feel that at that time, I owe (the Lunas) a debt of gratitude since I earned good money because of them.”

The Aman Futures agent said she decided to surrender to the NBI to “clear (her) name.”

“I am also a victim. I was seen helping the Lunas because I teach their children and it was inevitable that we became close,” said Coyme.


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  • TheThinkker

    Here it goes to show a lot too many people who call themselves investors fueled the Ponzi scam enterprise created by Amarillo. Amarillo, Coyme, their staff are as guilty as these ‘investors’ as all of them should know that you can’t earn big money at a short span of time unless there’s something fishy going on there.

    I’m wondering why they’re focusing on Mayor Co who withdrew Aman’s business permit (only to be issued back after being pressured under duress by thousands of people including some govt officials, I hear) and why they’re not seeing the other bigtime culprits in the local government who’s photos are not yet on the dailies…have envelopes passed hands fast?

    Besides a warning was made by DTI months before it exploded…and no one in government budged an inch. Where is DOJ then?

    Let’s see…



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